Neural progenitor cell-mediated delivery of osteoprotegerin limits disease progression in a preclinical model of neuroblastoma bone metastasis.
 

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Neural progenitor cell-mediated delivery of osteoprotegerin limits disease progression in a preclinical model of neuroblastoma bone metastasis.
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Neural progenitor cell-mediated delivery of osteoprotegerin limits disease progression in a preclinical model of neuroblastoma bone metastasis.

J Pediatr Surg. 2009 Jan;44(1):204-11

Authors: Sims TL, Hamner JB, Bush RA, Fischer PE, Kim SU, Aboody KS, McCarville B, Danks MK, Davidoff AM

PURPOSE: Osteoprotegerin (OPG) inhibits osteoclast activation and reduces osteolysis in bone tumors. We hypothesized that tumor-tropic neural progenitor cells (NPCs) engineered to express OPG would reduce neuroblastoma disease burden in the bone. METHODS: Stable expression of green fluorescent protein (NPC-GFP) and OPG (NPC-OPG) was established in human NPCs by lentivirus-mediated transduction. Bone disease was established by intrafemoral injection of luciferase-expressing human neuroblastoma (CHLA-255) cells into 20 SCID mice. Three weeks later, mice began receiving intravenous injection of 2 x 10(6) NPC-OPG or NPC-GFP (control) every 10 days x 3 doses. Disease was monitored with quantitative bioluminescence imaging and x-ray images, which were evaluated on a scale of 0 to 4. These studies were approved by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. RESULTS: Osteoprotegerin treatment in vitro produced no direct toxicity to tumor cells. Coculture of tumor cells with bone marrow significantly increased activation of bone marrow-derived osteoclasts as assessed by tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining (156 +/- 10.8 osteoclasts per well) compared to bone marrow culture alone (91.67 +/- 4.7, P = .005). This increase was abrogated by adding OPG-containing media (68.3 +/- 2.8, P = .001). NPC-OPG slowed tumor progression (108-fold increase from pretreatment) compared to mice treated with NPC-GFP (538-fold), as judged by bioluminescence imaging. X-rays subjectively demonstrated less bone disease in NPC-OPG-treated mice (2.27 +/- 0.25) compared to NPC-GFP-treated mice (3.25 +/- 0.22, P = .04). CONCLUSIONS: Neural progenitor cell-mediated delivery of OPG slowed disease progression in a preclinical model of neuroblastoma bone metastasis. The decrease in bone disease was not from direct tumor cell toxicity but likely occurred indirectly through inhibition of osteoclast-directed bone resorption. Thus, targeted delivery of OPG by NPCs may be effective in the treatment of neuroblastoma bone metastasis.

PMID: 19159744 [PubMed - in process]