Haemopoietic stem cell transplantation for children in Australia and New Zealand, 1998-2006: a report on behalf of the Australasian Bone Marrow Transplant Recipient Registry and the Australian and New
 

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02-11-09 08:23 AM
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Haemopoietic stem cell transplantation for children in Australia and New Zealand, 1998-2006: a report on behalf of the Australasian Bone Marrow Transplant Recipient Registry and the Australian and New Zealand Children's Haematology Oncology Group.
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Haemopoietic stem cell transplantation for children in Australia and New Zealand, 1998-2006: a report on behalf of the Australasian Bone Marrow Transplant Recipient Registry and the Australian and New Zealand Children's Haematology Oncology Group.

Med J Aust. 2009 Feb 2;190(3):121-125

Authors: Moore AS, Shaw PJ, Hallahan AR, Carter TL, Kilo T, Nivison-Smith I, O'Brien TA, Tapp H, Teague L, Wilson SR, Tiedemann K

OBJECTIVE: To document haemopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) activity and trends among paediatric patients in Australia and New Zealand. DESIGN, SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: A retrospective analysis of data reported to the Australasian Bone Marrow Transplant Recipient Registry by the seven paediatric HSCT institutions in Australia and New Zealand over the 9-year period 1998-2006, with particular focus on the most recent years (2002-2006). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Types of HSCT performed; transplant-related mortality (TRM); stem cell sources; indications for HSCT; causes of death after HSCT. RESULTS: Over the period 1998-2006, 522 autologous HSCT procedures (41%) and 737 allogeneic procedures (59%) were performed. About 60% of allogeneic transplants involved alternative donors (donors other than a human leukocyte antigen-matched sibling). The use of umbilical cord blood as a source of haemopoietic stem cells has doubled since 1998, with 34% of allogeneic transplants in 2006 using cord blood. Over the period 2002-2006, the median age of patients receiving transplants was 7 years (range, 0-19 years). The most common indications for allogeneic HSCT were acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (33%) and acute myeloid leukaemia (24%). The most common indications for autologous HSCT were neuroblastoma (23%), medulloblastoma (21%) and Ewing sarcoma (10%). TRM at 1 year after transplant was 22% for alternative donor transplants, 7% for matched-sibling transplants and 5% for autologous transplants. Relapse or persistence of a child's underlying condition accounted for 54% of all deaths within 1 year after transplant. CONCLUSIONS: HSCT is an important procedure for children with a range of life-threatening illnesses. Local trends in the indications for HSCT, donor selection and TRM reflect contemporary international practice.

PMID: 19203307 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]