Cyclooxygenase inhibitors differentially modulate p73 isoforms in neuroblastoma.
 

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Cyclooxygenase inhibitors differentially modulate p73 isoforms in neuroblastoma.
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Cyclooxygenase inhibitors differentially modulate p73 isoforms in neuroblastoma.

Oncogene. 2009 Apr 13;

Authors: Lau LM, Wolter JK, Lau JT, Cheng LS, Smith KM, Hansford LM, Zhang L, Baruchel S, Robinson F, Irwin MS

p73 encodes multiple functionally distinct isoforms. Proapoptotic TAp73 isoforms contain a transactivation (TA) domain, and like p53, have tumor suppressor properties and are activated by chemotherapies to induce cell death. In contrast, antiapoptotic DeltaNp73 isoforms lack the TA domain and are dominant-negative inhibitors of p53 and TAp73. DeltaNp73 proteins are overexpressed in a variety of tumors including neuroblastoma. Thus, identification of drugs that upregulate TAp73 and/or downregulate DeltaNp73 represents a potential therapeutic strategy. Here, we report that cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitors induce apoptosis independent of p53, and differentially modulate endogenous p73 isoforms in neuroblastoma and other tumors. COX inhibitor-mediated apoptosis is associated with the induction of TAp73beta and its target genes. COX inhibitors also downregulate the alternative-spliced DeltaNp73(AS) isoforms, Deltaexon2 and Deltaexon2/3. Furthermore, forced expression of DeltaNp73(AS) results in diminished apoptosis in response to the selective COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib. Celecoxib-mediated downregulation of DeltaNp73(AS) is associated with decreased E2F1 levels and diminished E2F1 activation of the p73 promoter. These results provide the first evidence that COX inhibitors differentially modulate p73 isoforms leading to enhanced apoptosis, and support the potential use of COX inhibitors as novel regulators of p73 to enhance chemosensitivity in tumors with deregulated E2F1 and in those with wild-type (wt) or mutant p53.Oncogene advance online publication, 13 April 2009; doi:10.1038/onc.2009.59.

PMID: 19363520 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]