Concurrent protective and destructive signaling of JNK2 in neuroblastoma cells.
 

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04-23-09 08:53 AM
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Concurrent protective and destructive signaling of JNK2 in neuroblastoma cells.
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Concurrent protective and destructive signaling of JNK2 in neuroblastoma cells.

Cell Signal. 2009 Jun;21(6):873-80

Authors: Waetzig V, Wacker U, Haeusgen W, Björkblom B, Courtney MJ, Coffey ET, Herdegen T

Investigation of the c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) has mainly focused on their response to stress and their pro-apoptotic effects. In this regard, JNKs are crucial mediators of chemotherapy-induced killing of tumor cells. Importantly, however, JNKs also have physiological functions in cancer involving cell cycle regulation or oncogenesis. Hypothetically, the composition of JNK signalosomes determines the signaling outcome which,in turn, implies a multitude of different, sometimes opposing and interfering functions. In the present study,the well-characterized human neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y served as a model system to separate physiological and pro-apoptotic JNK actions in the response to the cytoskeleton-interfering substances colchicine, cytochalasin D and taxol. Basically, JNKs mediated both cell death and proliferation. Using the chemical JNK inhibitor SP600125 as well as compartment-specific JNK-inhibiting constructs and dominant negative isoform mutants, we show that the nuclear subgroup of JNK2 is the dominant effector in colchicine and taxol-induced apoptosis, while cell cycle promotion is mediated by both cytoplasmic and nuclear JNK2.In contrast, cytochalasin D-triggered apoptosis is independent of JNK signaling. Interestingly, the data of the present study demonstrate for the first time that both cell protective (cell cycle progression) and destructive mechanisms (apoptosis) are simultaneously controlled by a single JNK isoform in the same cell system even under the influence of one stimulus. This has implications for the therapeutic application of JNK inhibitors and cytoskeleton-interfering substances in oncologic disorders.

PMID: 19385049 [PubMed - in process]