Thoracoscopic surgery in children in the Kyushu area of Japan.
 

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05-02-09 08:54 AM
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Thoracoscopic surgery in children in the Kyushu area of Japan.
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Thoracoscopic surgery in children in the Kyushu area of Japan.

Pediatr Int. 2009 Apr;51(2):250-3

Authors: Asabe K, Oka Y, Kai H, Shirakusa T, Iwasaki A

BACKGROUND: Recently, minimally invasive thoracoscopic surgery has offered several options for both the diagnosis and surgical treatment in the field of pediatric surgery. This report reviews the surgical experience in order to assess the problems including the complications, encountered during thoracoscopic surgery in children under 15 years of age in the Kyushu area, Japan. METHODS: From 1993 to 2005, 153 boys and 103 girls underwent thoracoscopic surgery for chest disease. Pertinent information included number of operations for each year, sex, age, indication, treatment procedure, follow-up duration, cause of conversion to thoracotomy, method of treatment, and complication. RESULTS: There has gradually been an increase in the number of operations every year. These included procedures for funnel chest, n= 121; pneumothorax, n= 25; mediastinal tumor, n= 25; palmar hyperhydrosis, n= 23; neuroblastoma, n= 11; and cystic lung disease, n= 10. A large portion of the surgery was for patients under 1 year of age excluding neonates. Approximately half of the procedures were for the excision of a neuroblastoma. Approximately half of the patients older than 5 years of age underwent Nuss procedure for funnel chest. Almost all of the pneumothorax and palmar hyperhydrosis surgery was for patients 14 or 15 years old. Three patients required a conversion to a standard thoracotomy. Six complications occurred. There was no mortality associated with the thoracoscopic surgical procedures. CONCLUSIONS: Thoracoscopy is a useful diagnostic and therapeutic tool for both infants and children. Various thoracoscopic complex procedures have been performed both safely and effectively.

PMID: 19405926 [PubMed - in process]