Surgical Complications in Abdominal Tumor Surgery in Children. Experiences at a Single Oncological Center.
 

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Surgical Complications in Abdominal Tumor Surgery in Children. Experiences at a Single Oncological Center.
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Surgical Complications in Abdominal Tumor Surgery in Children. Experiences at a Single Oncological Center.

Eur J Pediatr Surg. 2009 May 15;

Authors: Günther P, Tröger J, Holland-Cunz S, Behnisch W, Hinz U, Romero P, Schenk JP

INTRODUCTION: Surgical complications after tumor operations are frequent in children, with rates of up to 30% cited in the literature. Various approaches to reduce these complication rates have been attempted, with preoperative chemotherapy holding pride of place. One approach to minimize surgical complications is better preoperative preparation. In a retrospective analysis, we evaluated the complications associated with tumor surgery. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed patient data from 1991 to 2007. The distribution of the various tumors, the type of surgery, and complications were evaluated. For neuroblastomas a differentiated analysis of complications was performed, which included staging and radiologically defined surgical risk factors (SRFs). Patients were divided into two groups: A and B. Intensified surgical planning with 3D visualization was used in patients of group B. RESULTS: A total of 145 operations for abdominal tumors were performed in 123 patients. The three most common diseases were neuroblastoma (36%), nephroblastoma (26%), and ovarian tumor (19%). In 68% of patients complete resection and in 19% of cases partial resection of the tumor was carried out; open biopsy was performed in 13%. A total of 15 (10.3%) complications developed: the incidence of complications for group A was 11.8% and 7.7% for group B (p=0.5). For nephroblastoma these figures were 27.9% and 21.2% (p=1.0). In the group of patients with neuroblastoma, six complications developed in patients from group A (21.4%) and one in a group B patient (4.2%) (p=0.107). 54% of neuroblastomas were completely and 33% partially resected; these figures and the distribution of SRFs were similar in the two groups. A significant increase in the risk of complications could be seen with an increase in SRFs (p=0.0267) and with disease stages 2 and 3 (p=0.016). Tumor reduction surgery was also associated with an increase in complications (p=0.086). CONCLUSIONS: In summary, tumor surgery is associated with considerable risks in children. Therefore it is very important to look for new approaches that could potentially minimize these risks. As the causes of surgical complications are multifactorial, we are of the opinion that intensified surgical planning can contribute to reducing risks. Particularly neuroblastoma surgery could profit from an increased use of 3D visualization and improved preoperative planning.

PMID: 19449285 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]